The Lorelei Signal

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Columns, Arches, Blocks and Walls

Written by Robert William Shmigelsky / Artwork by Marge Simon

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Before they were made as well as could be
Making outstanding beings being, well, complicated
Men’s bodies were stretched and massaged into giants
Known here on out (idea theirs, not mine) as titan-gods.

They became almost as tall as the sky
And as broad as two peaks placed side by side.
This and that came and went easy for the titans,
But with rather quite unexpected results.

Take the first of dreamers, whom it took his
Building Babel merely a gigantic accident.
To keep that ivory tower standing, they had to prop,
Wrap and zigzag a city up along its entire base.

All it took was two broad hands and three stone
Slabs to build the world’s first arch.
After that, the trick was building upwards,
Learning how to miss the falling arches.

Once they smoothed the edges out and
Mastered how to raise and stand their columns,
For Abel and shirted muscle-bound crew
Only hours completing the coliseum.

Litter island and rock with castle and hall?
Mere a week to mix the lime and mortar.
Laying pyramids, ziggurats through the lands? Double done.
Ditto a month to build a wall so great to hold it all.

Meanwhile, on his days on the side, when he was free
What he learned, he built a year’s worth of terraced gardens
Laced with red brick and sprinkled with asphalt
Hanging with the widest range of plants and trees.

Sooner found that everything that could be—built.  
Later heard Abel the Dreamer ask the other builders,
“What is there for us to build from here on out?”
Answer? There was none so titans built no more.

Seeing this from high above, those who were wide awake
God then turned to marble stone and shrunk the rest
Whilst they slept, aware it would make them
Think before they said a thing like that again.

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Robert Shmigelsky runs over all things in his mind. Some of it squeaks out as poetry. He has been writing fantasy stories for himself longer than he can remember.

Besides reading and writing, some of his hobbies include computers, retro gaming and medieval and ancient history. He has a dry sense of humor, which he blames his stepfather for. Also, he has a habit of making history jokes no one but he understands.